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November 14th, 2017 by Steve Hanley 

At CleanTechnica, we try to be optimistic about climate change. We share the good news about renewable energy, carbon reductio... Read more on CleanTechnica

When a Cornell-led team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides.

Instead, they found a shocker: fungicides, commonly thought to have no impact.

"Insecticides work; they kill insects. Fungicides have been largely overlooked because they are not targeted for insects, but fungicides may not be quite as benign - toward bumblebees - as we once thought. This surprised us," said Scott McArt, assistant profess... Read more on phys.org

The US fight against climate change hasn’t exactly made much progress recently. Just this week, for instance, the Trump administration spent its time at the UN conference on climate cha... Read more on Mother Jones

An old school bus is operating once again in service of education — and the classroom is South Los Angeles.

Nonprofit Community Services Unlimited (CSU) last weekend unveiled its Veggie Bus project, along with breaking ground on the Paul Robeson Community Wellness Center. The upcycled bus is part workspace and classroom, part seed library and plant nursery, and a small piece of CSU’s broader vision for readily available produce and living-wage jobs in South L.A.

CSU had converted the diesel bus to run... Read more on nextcity.org

Business Insider recently asked more than 30 bartenders to weigh in on what they'd love to tell customers but can't.

One bartender said restaurants and bars don't keep their ice machines as clean as you think.

You may be better off ordering your drinks "neat" from now on.

Proceed ordering your drinks with caution.

When Business Insider recently asked more than 30 bartenders to weigh in on what they'd love to tell customers but can't, one response stood out as particularly disturbing:

"Almost no restaurants or bars c... Read more on Business Insider

Everyone in tech needs to relax for a minute.

The Big Five -- Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft -- aren't killing everybody and squashing all innovation. And not every start-up that scores venture funding from a prominent Silicon Valley firm turns out like Juicero or Theranos.

Start-ups still have a chance to go big if they operate honestly, and build their products and services around new technologies that the incumbents still haven't mastered.

While we used to think of mobile phones and cloud computing as cutting edge three or four years ago, th... Read more on CNBC

Is the llama about to have its moment? Will it be the new sloth? The next baby goat?

If a long-form holiday ad from Cost Plus World Market has anything to say about it, the gangly camelid could at least become this season’s reindeer.

“The Performance” follows a young boy as he preps for a school recital. His trumpet playing is dreadful at first, and he has considerately taken his wailing outdoors, saving the family from his nails-on-a-chalkboard practice sessions.

But a herd of llamas in a pasture nearby (in some scenic unnamed locale) migrate to the kid and patiently... Read more on adweek.com

Originally published by Michigan Farm News on November 9, 2017; republished with permission

Beginning Nov. 15, many livestock farms releasing hazardous substances to the air from animal waste are required to begin reporting air emissions.

In 2008, the EPA finalized a rule exempting almost all livestock farms from reporting requirements. The EPA based this rule on its determination that the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know... Read more on JD Supra

Over 15,000 scientists from 184 nations have co-signed a journal article pleading with humanity to embrace sustainability now before it is “too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

The article in BioScience,  “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” notes that 25 years ag... Read more on thinkprogress.org

Climate

South African activist Kumi Naidoo joins Democracy Now! at COP23 to discuss the U.S. presence at this year's U.N. climate summit.

"The U.N. cannot continue to pander to the madness that comes out of the Trump administration," Naidoo said, after the U.S. hosted a panel at the conference with a forum pushing coal, gas and nuclear power.

Watch the interview below:

Here's a transcript of the interview:

Amy Goodman: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. We're broadcasting live from the U.N. climate... Read more on EcoWatch

By Nexus Media

While President Donald Trump announced in June that the United States will be exiting the Paris Climate Agreement, local leaders from across the country are doubling down on their efforts to fight... Read more on thinkprogress.org

If you were to ask all of your friends what an ideal society looks like, I’m sure you’d receive vastly different answers. Maybe someone will suggest a society without war where everyone works together to solve problems. Your friend who just finished an Ayn Rand book will say something stupid. And maybe your vegan friend will pipe up and suggest a society without animal agriculture.

I, for one, think such an idea is impossible, but I’m also a morose pessimist who moved to Wisconsin by choice and whose favorite event was an... Read more on Gizmodo

Climate

South African activist Kumi Naidoo joins Democracy Now! at COP23 to discuss the U.S. presence at this year's U.N. climate summit.

"The U.N. cannot continue to pander to the madness that comes out of the Trump administration," Naidoo said, after the U.S. hosted a panel at the conference with a forum pushing coal, gas and nuclear power.

Watch the interview below:

Here's a transcript of the interview:

Amy Goodman: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. We're broadcasting live from the U.N. climate... Read more on EcoWatch

“My belief is that we will see a renaissance of violent conflict in the 21st century, and that many of these conflicts will spring from climate change.”

That’s what Harald Welzer... Read more on Vox

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers affiliated with both Virginia Polytechnic Institute and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has conducted an intriguing exercise—simulating the impact on the American diet and changes in greenhouse gas emissions if animal food products were completely eliminated from production, consumption and sale in the US. In their paper publi... Read more on phys.org

This story was originally published by High Country News and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. 

The complexity of climate change means it’s hard to trace si... Read more on Mother Jones

President Donald Trump skipped the last few engagements of his Asia trip and left Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to sit in a meeting in his stead.

Trump boasted about hundreds of billions in trade deals his trip would bring the US, though that number is subject to change.

Canada's President Justin Trudeau is still in the Philippines pushing human rights.

MANILA (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump skipped the plenary session of a summit of East and Southeast Asian leaders in Manila on Tuesday because of scheduling delays, but he said his marathon trip to the... Read more on Business Insider

Antibiotic resistance is a major public health concern in Europe. It is estimated that at least 25,000 people die every year because they are infected by bacteria that can no longer be killed by antibiotics.

We all need antibiotics that work – for both humans and animals. But overuse and misuse has spurred resistance. The more antibiotics are used, the more bacteria resist their effect. Such bacteria are also known as ‘superbugs’.

While humans should go easy on antibiotics, the same should apply to farm animals also. On average, in the European Union, consumption of antibioti... Read more on www.beuc.eu

A typical fall morning at Clark Brothers Orchard in Ashfield, Massachusetts, looks something like this: A packaging order is missing, a delivery truck is late, the harvest crew is short-handed, there’s hail damage from a summer storm, and a possible outbreak of an invasive insect pest is underway. It’s only 10 a.m.

Brothers Dana and Aaron Clark, along with Dana’s son Silas, daughter Naomi, and her husband Craig, are the heart of the operation. Other family members pitch in when they’re needed. Mid-September is peak apple season, and this year’s crop looks like the biggest the Clarks... Read more on Civil Eats

Catch The Long Road Home on

Tuesdays at 9/8c on National Geographic.

It was a few weeks after the rains failed in the winter of 2009 that residents of Shirqat first noticed the strange bearded men.

Circling like vultures among the stalls of the town’s fertilizer market in Iraq’s northern Salahaddin governorate, they’d arrow in on the most shabbily dressed farmers, and tempt them with... Read more on news.nationalgeographic.com

We humans go to great lengths to appear younger than we are. Sharks, it seems, do it naturally.

About a decade ago, studies began to hint that many sharks have longer lifespans than previously suspected. Now, a new analysis that pulled together data from more than 50 studies suggests a "widespread" underestimation of lifespans among many sharks, rays, and cartilaginous fish. (Explore the interactive: "Sizing Up Sharks, the Lords of the Sea.")

That's because newer methods of aging sharks—such as bomb carbon dating—are proving more accurate than the tra... Read more on news.nationalgeographic.com

The Trump Administration took its pitch for fossil fuels to the heart of international efforts to stem global warming on Monday hosting an event featuring coal and natural gas executives on the sidelines of an annual United Nations climate conference held this year in Germany.

As negotiators fro... Read more on Time