There Will Be Bread

There Will Be Bread

Anna Roth of the San Francisco Weekly writes of the changing wheat economy in the Bay Area.  As Roth explains, while concerned consumers are becoming more aware of the sources of their food, “creating a local grain economy is about shedding light on a part of the food ecosystem that’s been dark for a long time.” Sharing a common conception with most consumers, Roth had never considered, let alone understood, the fundamentals of growing and harvesting wheat or the process of producing flour.  It was always a cheap staple in the pantry. Upon tasting fresh, locally produced wheat flour and experiencing the varieties and flavors that have been repressed, Roth embarked on a mission to understand the story of flour and the efforts put forth by locals, such as Community Grain’s Bob Klein, to re-vitalize one of the oldest relationships between man and heritage grains.

Read Anna Roth's full story, "There Will Be Bread: The Newest Development in Food Culture is Also the Oldest."

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