Using every cut and offal (internal organs and entrails) from an animal, that has been treated with respect, to feed a community.

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Nose to Tail

Nose to Tail

Douglas Gayeton/Lexicon of Sustainability

Nose to Tail

Nose to Tail:  Using every cut and offal (internal organs and entrails) from an animal, that has been treated with respect, to feed a community.

This head will either become head cheese, porchetta di testa, pork stock, or maybe even get braised.

Matt is a chef.

Matt says:
“When buying whole animals it is important to use everything. It shows respect for an animal that gave its life to feed us. So this means trying not to waste it.” He makes “porchetta di testa” from the head, brined and grilled shoulder steaks, bacon, smoked and grilled ribs, whole bone in Loin-cut chops, tenderloin for Canadian bacon, guanciale from jowls, braised and fried ears, pickled tongue, pork liver mousse, braised trotters (used to make croquettes) and lastly sausage made from all the trimmings.

Whole Hog

Whole Hog

Douglas Gayeton/Lexicon of Sustainability

Whole Hog

When Chef JC Balek of Palantir Technologies buys a hog he uses the whole animal (it's a question of respect).

"I really care about how an animal is raised. I only buy animals that have one bad day in their lives." - JC Balek

"Many places only serve the cuts they know will sell," JC Says, "and this is the fault of everyone involved. Most consumers still think meat comes in styrofoam containers wrapped in plastic labeled 'guaranteed tender'. They only recognize the primal cuts - strip, ribeye, filet, etc. - but if more chefs bought the entire carcass, they might be able to show consumers that the entire animal is delicious."

Read more about Chef JC on the blog written by Julie Morris of Morris Grassfed Beef at the link below.

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