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The patterns and practices of growing food are constantly adapting to time, place, and local culture, but the ways of growing are informed by heritage.

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Agricultural Heritage

Agricultural Heritage

Location: Umurima Wi Burundi ("The Farm of Burundi Women"), Decatur, GA
Featuring: Burundi refugee women

The patterns and practices of growing food are constantly adapting to time, place, and local culture, but the ways of growing are informed by heritage. This is agricultural heritage.

These Burundi refugee farmers in Decatur, Georgia (a suburb of Atlanta) are maintaining a vital cultural connection to their homeland, providing food security for their families, earning a supplemental income, and sharing their vast farming knowledge with their children and community. Here, they are developing skills to integrate into a new country while preserving their culture.

The success of Umurima Wi Burundi has inspired Susan and Robin to develop Global Growers Network, a program that creates new agricultural opportunities in Georgia for international farmers who were forced to flee their homelands as refugees due to war, genocide, and persecution.

Heritage Garden

Heritage Garden

Douglas Gayeton for Lexicon of Sustainability

Heritage Garden

Location: Maize Field, Brooklyn, NY

Featuring: Jeff Hutcheson

In the 1600’s the first Dutch settlers of Boerum Hill found themselves amidst Native American maize fields. Nearly four hundred years later those fields have returned. Christina Kelly came across Reginald Bolton’s book, “Indian Paths in the Great Metropolis”. There she found detailed maps of Brooklyn’s historic maize fields. After tracking down heritage seeds consistent with those of the period, she replanted this field with the help of Jeff Hutcheson (a freelance gardener) at what is now the corner of Smith and Bergen in Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill neighborhood.

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